Watercolor Whimsy: Fanuna's Tarot

Deck used: Fanuna's Tarot (Fanuna)

Deck used: Fanuna's Tarot (Fanuna)

I first found out about the delightful Fanuna's Tarot through one of my YouTube favorites, Ethony. At the time her video came on, I was in the market for a deck with a lot of white space and it was actually a toss up between the self-published Linestrider Tarot (which has since become mass produced and readily available anywhere!) and this deck. I can't define in exact terms what led me to pick this one over the other (Linestrider is still on my to-buy list), but I must say I am happy with my choice.

One of the more underrated self-published decks out there, this is an Easy creation that makes use of whimsical watercolor illustrations to depict the 78 cards of the tarot. The deck comes in a handmade box, which kind of got banged up in the post (not a big deal). I love handmade touches and this deck, which comes with a couple of card doubles plus a free sticker is no exception.

The cards are based on the Rider Waite Smith, and without looking at the titles it's fairly easy to tell what's what… which is why I don't entirely mind the little typo from my deck — you'll notice that the Knight of Cups is mislabelled.

The cards are based on the Rider Waite Smith, and without looking at the titles it's fairly easy to tell what's what… which is why I don't entirely mind the little typo from my deck — you'll notice that the Knight of Cups is mislabelled.

This deck has one of my favorite card stocks. It's matte with a sheen—it riffle shuffles very well and is thick enough for you not to worry about damaging the cards. The card back has a simple decorative embellishment as its main visual… nothing special or dramatic, although I do love this particular shade of blue. 

Fanuna's Tarot is a South American-produced deck so shoppers have the option of purchasing the guidebook in Spanish or English. I chose the English option, but I have to admit I never really dug into it anyway. Just the same, it's good to know that I'll be able to flip through the definitions whenever I feel called to.

Apart from the clever use of white space, this deck is distinctive for its use of humans and mythical creatures. You have a good sense of the fantasy world you're entering when you flip through Fanuna's cards. I love the very clear lines drawn between the suits—you get a defined color palette for each suit. The fiery wands have deep burgundies and reds. The quartz suit represents the earth element is a muddy green I don't see used to often, making it a refreshing choice. The cups is an ocean blue for water, and the swords is a smoky gray which points to the air element. I love it when deck creators make distinctions between the suits via color—when you have your cards spread out, it's easy to pick out prevalent themes and strong messages in a single glance.

When I purchased my deck, I also got a personalized message, which is a touch I really appreciated! We went back and forth on Etsy's message section, just trading stories about which parts of the world we're from. That's the kind of relationship you hope to build with self-published authors and artists—the type of exchange you know you can't really get from a big box publisher. Really, it's the little things that count, sometimes!

Fanuna's Tarot, to me, is like a refreshing drink of ice cold water on a hot summer day. It's a deck I use when I want something that won't knock me around with dark and stormy images. When you're dealing with a lot and need to pull the cards for some positivity and some truth-telling, it helps to use a deck that will deal you what you need to hear minus the eyeball drama that a lot of the overly theatrical decks conjure.

If you're in the market for a self-published deck and want to support a self-published author, give this one a chance, folks. It's a kind, charming, and fun deck that any collection would be lucky to have.