Tarot Top 5: Boredom Busters

Decks used:  Iris Oracle (Mary Elizabeth Evans, Spirit Speak), Animal Wisdom Tarot (Dawn Brunke and Ola Liola, Cico Books), Tarot of Jane Austen (Diane Wilkes and Lola Airaghi, Lo Scarabeo), Morgan's Tarot (Morgan Robbins, US Games), After Tarot (Pietro Alligo and Giullia F. Massaglia, Lo Scarabeo), Tarot of the New Vision (Pietro Alligo, Lo Scarabeo)

Decks used:  Iris Oracle (Mary Elizabeth Evans, Spirit Speak), Animal Wisdom Tarot (Dawn Brunke and Ola Liola, Cico Books), Tarot of Jane Austen (Diane Wilkes and Lola Airaghi, Lo Scarabeo), Morgan's Tarot (Morgan Robbins, US Games), After Tarot (Pietro Alligo and Giullia F. Massaglia, Lo Scarabeo), Tarot of the New Vision (Pietro Alligo, Lo Scarabeo)

While it would be super ideal to always be pulling cards because I want to set intentions, give someone a positive message, or soothe my soul, I think I actually turn to my tarot collection when I don't have anything better to do and I just feel like playing. You're never bored when you're toting a tarot deck with you—even just one image can provide hours upon hours of inspiration and creative prompts! Shuffling the cards is also pretty calming when your hands are feeling a little fidgety, and drawing random cards to put together a story just because is one of my most favorite things to do when the world is kind and I am gifted with some free time.

If you're looking for decks to keep your mind busy when you've got some down time, turn to this list for a couple of sets that can offer some true blue tarot (and oracle!) entertainment.

  • Iris Oracle. Most oracle decks contain less than 78 cards, but this one is just as meaty and rich as any tarot deck. With more cards to riffle through and more images to pore over, you'll find yourself lost in the colorful shadow-and-light world created by prolific self-published artist Mary Elizabeth Evans of Spirit Speak. Another benefit to pulling this oracle deck out when you have free time is its guidebook—despite a couple of typos here and there, its messages are clear, concise and surprisingly meaningful. (Check out my review on this oracle deck over here.)
  • Animal Wisdom Tarot. I'm not a big animal person so I find this deck keeps me busy going back and forth between cards and guidebook. The Animal Wisdom Tarot comes with a brilliantly put-together guidebook, which provides thorough explanations of the correspondences between the illustrated animals and the major and minor arcana meanings we've become familiar with. When I'm feeling extra nerdy, I like to quiz myself on the meanings (LOL).
  • Tarot of Jane Austen. In the same way that I get to nerd out with the Animal Wisdom Tarot, the Tarot of Jane Austen keeps me busy because it has me shifting back and forth between the cards and either one of the: a. little white book, b. bigger, thicker companion book, c. my copies of the actual Austen novels, or d. (and this is my favorite thing to do) the Jane Austen movie adaptations. I love comparing and contrasting, and again, quizzing myself to see if I have all the correspondences down pat. (I talk more about this on the site here.)
  • Morgan's Tarot. Not technically a tarot deck, this black and while doodle deck provides off kilter 1960s psychedelic humor in the form of oracle cards. Some of the messages in this deck are downright ridiculous, others are goofy, while some can actually get you thinking about the serious stuff. A couple of pulls from this will certainly keep you entertained. (More on Morgan's Tarot here.)
  • After Tarot and the Tarot of New Vision. If you're feeling a little ho-hum about the RWS, these two decks (which I will count as one for the purpose of this list) will give you a totally new perspective to the traditional images and meanings. These decks expand our knowledge of the cards done by Pamela Colman Smith and AE Waite by giving us ideas about what happens behind the images we know and what takes place right after the snapshot provided by the original deck. (Find out more about these two decks through my review.)

What decks do you like to pull out when you just want to play? Do you prefer to take things seriously or just throw some decks around? Send me a message and share your own thoughts—I'd love to start a conversation with you!