Get Out of Your Head: 5 Reasons Why Oracle-Only Readings Work

 Decks used:  Morgan’s Tarot  (US Games) and  Ritual Oracle  (Kristi Prokopiak, Ritual Tarot)

Decks used: Morgan’s Tarot (US Games) and Ritual Oracle (Kristi Prokopiak, Ritual Tarot)

If you’ve been following my posts, you’ll know that I’ve been spending all of my weekends this month doing a 100-hour Meditation Teacher Training. It’s been really interesting, extremely challenging (I’ve already hit a couple of existential walls and we’re only halfway through), and time-consuming.

My Sunday mornings and weekend nights that are usually when I spend time pulling cards for myself or free-writing are all but obliterated now that I’m immersed in my training. When I do get to do a simple three-card spread, I find myself going on auto-pilot.

I guess the thing about reading the tarot for other people (and for myself!) for a while is that you can easily fall into the trap of mindlessness. I know that having stock knowledge of traditional meanings is good and important as a foundation—but given my headspace right now, I’m not exactly able to go deep.

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So last night, inspired by the many posts I’ve been seeing on Everyday Magic with the Morgan’s Tarot, I decided to do something different and give my brain a little jig. I did a Celtic Cross spread using only oracle cards so I have no choice but to really think about what’s on the cards or the guidebook and not just fall back on meanings that have been hard-wired into my brain.

Morgan’s Tarot is a 70s oracle deck (not a tarot deck!) that I purchased really early on in my practice at a woowoo cafe near the yoga studio I used to work at. Ritual Oracle is by the awesome Kristi Prokopiak is the sister oracle deck to my all-time fave, the Illest Tarot.

 Pulled this for the position meant to describe my “Self.” This certainly cracked me up—the guidebook says that Grass was taken by lower-class Hindus. My insight? I am salt of the earth! (if any of you listen to Pod Save America, my head immediately went to Jon Lovett, LOL).

Pulled this for the position meant to describe my “Self.” This certainly cracked me up—the guidebook says that Grass was taken by lower-class Hindus. My insight? I am salt of the earth! (if any of you listen to Pod Save America, my head immediately went to Jon Lovett, LOL).

The experiment was interesting! I don’t use the Morgan’s Tarot a lot because while some cards worked well, I couldn’t get too into the Buddhism aspect of it. But now that I’ve been studying meditation, the connections I made were immediate. Even the guidebook, which I felt was a little difficult to comprehend before made so much sense now. (If anyone wants to play with this deck, do it with a Zen or Vipassana practice and you’ll get it!)

I used the Ritual Oracle to bookend my reading, pulling it at the start and end—something I typically do with this deck with the tarot. As usual, the photos were spot on and the guidebook presented reflections that were succinct but ultimately meaningful.

 The cards were spot on with themes that have been my head all through my training—waking up, learning about “reality” as a construct, and non-judgement.

The cards were spot on with themes that have been my head all through my training—waking up, learning about “reality” as a construct, and non-judgement.

So here’s what I learned, in case you need some convincing about this experiment:

  1. It’s good to get out of your comfort zone every once in a while. I am a massive supporter of the comfort zone (who doesn’t want to feel comfortable?) but I must admit that it felt good to be in completely unfamiliar territory. I could imagine the synapses in my brain going off!

  2. Sometimes structure works, sometimes no structure works. I’ve always said I preferred tarot to oracle more because I liked having a framework. Oracle just felt too loosey-goosey to use for a full-on reading. And yes, this was loosey-goosey and organic and felt like me heading into frontier land without a clue—but all of those things actually did me good. My sense of perception was heightened throughout the reading and I worked harder to make connections.

  3. Oracle-only readings can run deep. I suppose this depends on the type of deck you use. I can’t imagine pulling an entire Celtic Cross full of affirmation cards, that would be kind of self-aggrandizing. But Morgan’s was absolutely perfect for this. I imagine Spirit Speak’s Vessel Oracle would make a good option too.

 The funnest part of my reading was the final card from the Ritual Oracle—it told me to head to the desert… which I’m actually doing in a couple of months! (See you, Palm Springs!)

The funnest part of my reading was the final card from the Ritual Oracle—it told me to head to the desert… which I’m actually doing in a couple of months! (See you, Palm Springs!)

4. They rewire a tarot reader’s brain. The insights I pulled from the cards last night don’t make me want to run for the hills when it comes to the tarot—they did quite the opposite. I imagine that these new and fresh connections I made will add more dimension and layers to the archetypes of the tarot I’ve already become familiar with.

5. On a totally superficial level… they look good. :D And if that counts at all to you, then you know what I mean when I say that aesthetics can also contribute to a good reading.


Have you tried Oracle-only yourself? I want to hear what you think about it! Comment below or share your thoughts on my Instagram. Let’s connect :)

xx